Girl Scouts of Texas Oklahoma Plains

Girl Scouts of Texas Oklahoma Plains

We’re 28,000 strong – 28,000 girls and adults who believe every girl can change the world. Girl Scouts of Texas Oklahoma Plains began more than 100 years ago with one woman, Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low, who believed in the power of every girl. Today, we continue her vision of building girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place by helping them discover their inner strength, passions and talents. Thanks to the programs from Fort Worth to the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles, there’s a chance for every girl to do something amazing.

Funding from the Ella C. McFadden Endowment Fund has been used to support the Girl Scouts at School program (GSAS). GSAS provides quality programming for girls in low-income areas during the school day or after school, making the program
more accessible. Financial status plays no part in program delivery and financial 04_Closing_Ceremony-164 - OK Girl Scoutsassistance is afforded to all girls participating in the program. GSAS serves more than 4,000 girls at 40 school sites within FWISD.

Through school-based, staff-led troop experiences, field trips, two STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) specific events, a mother-daughter banquet and a special awards ceremony, girls receive at least two hours of Girl Scout activities twice per month throughout the school year averaging 40 hours per troop each year. As with traditional Girl Scout troops, Girl Scouts at School’s troops earn badges and awards based upon their learning experiences. For example, this year’s troops will be following the Girl Scouts Journey “It’s Your Story, Tell It”, helping girls develop a strong sense of self, learning about the benefits of a balanced diet and physical activity, navigating healthy relationships, identifying ways to express themselves and promoting well-being and confidence in others.

Many Title I schools in Tarrant County need additional support from community partners to reinforce academic readiness and student development. With increasing school budget cuts, partnerships are needed more than ever. The GSAS program delivers comprehensive, curriculum-based programs during the school day and after school (at schools, community centers and nonprofits) where volunteers cannot deliver the program; this is due in part to the time of day and difficulty in being able to recruit volunteers who are willing to work in certain areas.

GSAS’s primary goal is to see improved behavior in participants. Improved behavior – we believe – is achieved through the following behavior related outcomes from Girl Scouts of the USA’s national outcomes:

  • Girls develop healthy relationships
  • Girls promote cooperation and team building
  • Girls can resolve conflicts
  • Girls advance diversity in a multicultural world

In addition, girls will perceive that Girl Scouting has helped them to grow and develop their leadership skills, including working well with others and feeling confident in their ability to lead.09_Computers-024 - OK Girl Scouts

Outcomes for the 2013-2014 school year include:

  • 59% of girls said they learned cooperatively during their time in Girl Scouts.
  • 45% said they “learned by doing” during their time in Girl Scouts.
  • 60% said that Girl Scouts has helped them to get to know new people in their schools and communities.
  • 41% of girls said that because of their Girl Scout experiences, they have been a leader in more activities with their friends, class, or community.
  • Nearly 60% say that what they’ve learned in Girl Scouts has helped them to work better with others on projects and activities.
  • 60% said that because of what they have learned in Girl Scouts, they are better team members.
  • 57% of girls said that Girl Scouts has prepared them to be a leader.

To celebrate 30 years of giving from the Ella C. McFadden Endowment Fund, North Texas Community Foundation is hosting a series called 13 Days of Giving. Each weekday through December 17, we’ll share a story highlighting how one of the nonprofits benefitting from the fund has impacted this region. Be sure to follow us on Facebook to receive the daily alerts, or visit www.cfntx.org.